June 9th
18:29
Via

backtotheussr:

A small collection of Soviet era guide books (via)

December 25th
19:30
Via

Hill of Crosses by Tim Pritlove on Flickr.
These are pictures of the Hill of Crosses in Lithuania. This hill has captured my mind and my imagination with its story of mystery, bravery, devotion and love. It is estimated that their are well over 50,000 crosses and some estimates say 100,000. The hill signified Lithuania’s freedom, original identity, religion and heritage and was used as a form of peaceful resistance during Lithuania’s occupation by the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union tried to destroy it three times but the people of Lithuania would not allow their symbol of hope to die.

Hill of Crosses by Tim Pritlove on Flickr.

These are pictures of the Hill of Crosses in Lithuania. This hill has captured my mind and my imagination with its story of mystery, bravery, devotion and love. It is estimated that their are well over 50,000 crosses and some estimates say 100,000. The hill signified Lithuania’s freedom, original identity, religion and heritage and was used as a form of peaceful resistance during Lithuania’s occupation by the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union tried to destroy it three times but the people of Lithuania would not allow their symbol of hope to die.

December 4th
16:21
Via

fyeaheasterneurope:

Lithuania was the last pagan nation in Europe. Although the rulers and elite converted to Catholicism in the 14th century, they made no particular effort to stop popular pagan practices, which continued on for another couple centuries. This map shows the spread of Christianity in 1300 - take a look at Lithuania, the only blank spot in a sea of dates and colors.

That pre-Christian influence is still visible in Lithuania’s distinctive style of crosses, which reflect imagery of the pagan World Tree.