July 22nd
18:35
Via
breathtakingdestinations:

Camogli - Liguria - Italy (von spettacolopuro)

breathtakingdestinations:

Camogli - Liguria - Italy (von spettacolopuro)

16:01
Via
fotojournalismus:

Members of the Worker-Peasant Red Guards, the civilian forces of North Korea, train in an undisclosed location on August 20, 2012, in this picture released by the official KCNA news agency on August 21, 2012.
[Credit : KCNA via Reuters]

fotojournalismus:

Members of the Worker-Peasant Red Guards, the civilian forces of North Korea, train in an undisclosed location on August 20, 2012, in this picture released by the official KCNA news agency on August 21, 2012.

[Credit : KCNA via Reuters]

July 21st
20:43
Via
theoddcollection:

indypendenthistory:

Natural History Museum, London. 1903

Lovely!

theoddcollection:

indypendenthistory:

Natural History Museum, London. 1903

Lovely!

16:01
Via
hyungjk:

Coal Miners

hyungjk:

Coal Miners

architectureofdoom:

Syktyvkar, Russia

architectureofdoom:

Syktyvkar, Russia

heatherleephotographie:

"Dirty Lines II"
Hong Kong, 2009

heatherleephotographie:

"Dirty Lines II"

Hong Kong, 2009

July 20th
16:54
Via
16:16
Via

cool-critters:

Gharial (Gavialis gangeticus)

The gharial, also known as the gavial, and the fish-eating crocodile, is a crocodilian of the family Gavialidae, native to the Indian Subcontinent. The global gharial population is estimated at less than 235 individuals, which are threatened by loss of riverine habitat, depletion of fish resources and use of fishing nets. As the population has declined drastically in the past 70 years, the gharial is listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN. The gharial is one of the longest of all living crocodilians, measuring up to 6.25 m (20.5 ft). With 110 sharp interdigitated teeth in its long thin snout it is well adapted to catching fish, its main diet. The male has a distinctive boss at the end of the snout, which resembles an earthenware pot known as ghara. 

16:00
Via

awkwardsituationist:

the waitomo caves of new zealand’s northern island, formed two million years ago from the surrounding limestone bedrock, are home to an endemic species of bioluminescent fungus gnat (arachnocampa luminosa, or glow worm fly) who in their larval stage produce silk threads from which to hang and, using a blue light emitted from a modified excretory organ in their tails, lure in prey who then become ensnared in sticky droplets of mucus.

photos from spellbound waitomo tours, forevergone, blue polaris, and martin rietze. (more cave photos) (more bioluminescence photos)